The Big Reveal (for 2018)

After such a banner year (publishing 3 books in 2017) I’m excited to say that my fourth book will be out in May of 2018:

Southern Writers on Writing, an anthology I edited, coming from University Press of Mississippi.

With a foreword by Alan Lightman (a Memphis native known mostly for his brilliant science writing) and essays by twenty-six southern authors (13 women and 13 men), this is a collection the literary world has been waiting for. Last week I read this wonderful guest post on Jane Friedman’s blog, “How and Why to Edit an Anthology,” by Margot Kahn, which was encouraging, as I’ve had such a positive experience putting together this collection.

Just got the official COVER to share! Thanks to Oxford (Mississippi) photographer Ed Croom for this wonderful image. Ed read the essays in the collection first, and drew inspiration from them for his photo shoot at Rowan Oak, the historic home of William Faulkner. You can read more about the photograph in my Author’s Note when the book comes out!

SouthernWritersOnWritingCOVER

9,806 Miles

Susan signs Pass Books

Signing CHERRY BOMB at Pass Books in Pass Christian, Mississippi (with a view of the ocean)

 

As we near the end of 2017, I thought it would be fun to take a look back at my book tour travels this year. It was incredible to have three books published within six months (February, March, and August) but it did present a marketing challenge. I am so thankful to the bookstores (independents and big box stores) who welcomed me for 2-3 visits during the year to read from my books. And to the Friends of the Library groups, book clubs, and friends who hosted me for private salons in their homes. I’ve already added the miles I’ll be driving in December (I have 6 more events in December for Cherry Bomb), and the total for the year will be 9,806 miles (in ten months, March through December). That’s an average of 980 miles/month that I drove for book tours this year! Here’s a recap of those events:

With my author friend River Jordan, just before she interviewed me at the Southern Festival of Books in Nashville for Clearstory Radio

With my author friend River Jordan, just before she interviewed me at the Southern Festival of Books in Nashville for Clearstory Radio

21 events for Cherry Bomb

12 events for Tangles and Plaques

9 events for A Second Blooming

 

At the Pat Conroy Literary Center in Beaufort, South Carolina, just before a reading of A SECOND BLOOMING with Cassandra King, NancyKay Wessman, and Susan Marquez at Nevermore Books

At the Pat Conroy Literary Center in Beaufort, South Carolina, just before a reading of A SECOND BLOOMING with Cassandra King, NancyKay Wessman, and Susan Marquez at Nevermore Books

Visited 16 cities/towns and 9 states

 

Skyped with a book club in Texas

 

Types of events/venues:

 

Bookstores:  18

 

Libraries (Friends of the Library groups and/or book clubs): 6

 

Book clubs in homes: 4

 

Celebrating with Beth Ann Fennelly (Poet Laureate of Mississippi) at the Mississippi Book Festival

Celebrating with Beth Ann Fennelly (Poet Laureate of Mississippi) at the Mississippi Book Festival

Book Festivals (in 3 states): 3

 

Private salons in homes: 2

 

Community College Women’s Conference: 1

 

Alzheimer’s Support Group: 1

 

Music & Books event at bar/restaurant: 1

 

Memphis Botanic Gardens: 1

 

With Memphis contributors to A SECOND BLOOMING at our launch at the Memphis Botanic Gardens: me, Jen Bradner, Ellen Morris Prewitt, Sally Thomason, and Susan Henley

With Memphis contributors to A SECOND BLOOMING at our launch at the Memphis Botanic Gardens: me, Jen Bradner, Ellen Morris Prewitt, Sally Thomason, and Susan Henley

In 2018 I’m looking forward to adding to those miles and events as I travel to Nacogdoches, Texas for the Pulpwood Queens Girlfriend Weekend in January—where I’m on panels for both Cherry Bomb and A Second Blooming—and then finish up my Cherry Bomb tour at a few more events in Memphis and Mississippi.

In 1988, as I was leaving my home town of Jackson, Mississippi, to move to Memphis—and especially as I was leaving the aerobic dance business that I directed for several years in my thirties—the song that brought tears to my eyes most often was “I’ve Had the Time of My Life.” It might sound silly, but running that aerobic dance business was one of the first things I ever did that made me feel really good about myself, so it was difficult to leave it. The lyrics are running through my head this morning as I think about how wonderful this year has been, and I’m so thankful to have realized this part of my dream as a writer.

Flight, Qwirkle, Hot Fudge Pie, and the Egg Bowl

Our kids aren’t visiting for Thanksgiving this year so we’re going to have a non-traditional celebration. We’re going out for lunch with friends who are also without their kids this year… to one of my favorite restaurants in Memphis—FLIGHT. It’s downtown, about 5 minutes from our house, has valet parking, wonderful atmosphere, and delicious food. Afterwards the four of us will come back to our house for my homemade hot fudge pie with ice cream, and play Qwirkle. (Great fun—if you haven’t played it, add it to your Christmas gift list!)

Flight_Home_Hero

 

Ole Miss(2)We’ll spend the remains of the day watching the “Egg Bowl” on TV. Go, Landsharks!

I just read through my Thanksgiving posts from the past few years, and also reminisced about my favorite Thanksgivings at my Aunt Barbara Jo and Uncle Dan’s home in Jackson, Mississippi. Barbara Jo’s famous cornbread dressing recipe is in one of the posts from 2014, below.

Thanksgiving and Gluttony (2016)

Dealing With a Weight-Loss Plateau (2015)

The Best Thanksgiving Ever! (2014)

The Best Cornbread Dressing Ever! (2014)

Skipping Thanksgiving (2013)

Thankful People (2011)

Grandchildren, Godchildren, and Thanksgiving (2010)

Thanksgiving (2009)

636468843640325496-112317-Ramsey-EggBowl

I’ll close with a few words about gratitude from a fellow Mississippi author:

“Gratitude is a quality similar to electricity: it must be produced and discharged and used up in order to exist at all.” – William Faulkner

The Saint Nicholas Day Snow

St Nick Day Snow coverThe talented children’s author Charlotte Riggle has done it again. With help from the gifted illustrator, R. J. Hughes, “Charli” has given us a colorful, poignant look at a beloved historic figure through the eyes of two families who celebrate his life in The Saint Nicholas Day Snow (Phoenix Flair Press, October 27, 2017). The story does have an Orthodox Christian setting (and characters) but it will capture readers of all religious and cultural backgrounds. Anyone who loves Christmas and tradition and children and story.

Charlotte Riggle, author

Charlotte Riggle, author

Although Charli no longer lives in the South, she was born in Oxford, Mississippi. Her mom used to go horseback riding with William Faulkner’s daughter. Her grandfather was the dean of the School of Education at the University of Mississippi. She’s currently living in the Pacific Northwest, between Seattle and Mount Rainier. We met through Saint John Orthodox Church here in Memphis, where she was a member for many years before moving to the Seattle area. My husband and I are Godparents to her youngest child, and I’ve been blessed to be her friend for about twenty-five years.

When Charli’s first book, Catherine’s Pascha, came out in 2015, I knew she had found her niche. Not that this is the only niche available to her. Charli is a brilliant and gifted technical writer and is knowledgeable in many fields. It takes that kind of genius to write a good children’s book. Genius coupled with an intense love for people—especially children, and even more especially children with special needs and disabilities.

If you’d like to hear more from Charli about this project, read her blog post, “Why I Wrote the Saint Nicholas Day Snow.”

The Saint Nicholas Day Snow will make a terrific Christmas gift for your children, grandchildren, Godchildren, nieces, nephews, and neighbor kids. Read a description and order the book here or from Amazon.

Wooden Sidewalks (Eupora, Mississippi)

Mr. Carl Ray, Murrah High School, Jackson, Mississippi, 1969

Mr. Carl Ray, Murrah High School, Jackson, Mississippi, 1969

When I was a student at Murrah High School in Jackson, Mississippi (1966-1969) I had a guidance counselor named Carl Ray. Mr. Ray was very formal in his speech and demeanor—even a bit stuffy. And we were an odd pairing, since I was an academic “rebel” of sorts. It’s not that I was a complete slouch—I finished 67th in a class of 407. But there were quite a few National Merit finalists and scholars ahead of me on that list, and frankly, I didn’t really care. I wasn’t on the fast track to academic excellence. I was more interested in other things.

Feature writer, Murrah "Hoofbeat," 1966-67

Feature writer, Murrah “Hoofbeat,” 1966-67

Beginning with my sophomore year (first year for our high school) when I got a part in the school’s production of “Our Town,” and also nabbed a position as feature writer on the school newspaper, “The Hoofbeat.” During my junior and senior years I majored in the arts, painting stage scenery for our musical production of “L’il Abner” while continuing with the newspaper, as advertising manager and finally business manager. Did I mention that I made it all the way through high school without taking any classes in science or languages? And only minimal mathematics courses? I loved English, and my senior year I had a terrific teacher who focused on composition and taught me to revise my work. So how did my path put me at odds with my guidance counselor?

A scene from "Our Town," in which I played "Rebecca," younger sister of "George," played by my brother Mike. Murrah High School 1966.

A scene from “Our Town,” in which I played “Rebecca,” younger sister of “George,” played by my brother Mike. Murrah High School 1966.

I remember being called into Mr. Ray’s office once (well, more than once) to talk about my schedule for the following year, which would have been my senior year. He expressed concern because I didn’t have any science courses. I reminded him that I took biology in the 9th grade, and that was the last year of science that was required to graduate. He was miffed because most students who skip 9th grade science in order to take biology are on the advanced route—they do this in order to take three advanced science courses in high school. I did it to get out of one year of science. He couldn’t make me take more. But what about language and accelerated math? I wasn’t interested in either. I padded my schedule with advanced art, journalism, and home economics, which I scheduled during lunch so I could take my own food and warm it up in the classroom’s kitchen. Poor Mr. Ray was frustrated with my lack of academic motivation.

Some of the students in our school made fun of Mr. Ray for being from the small town of Eupora, Mississippi. I remember hearing them ask him if they had wooden sidewalks in Eupora. I never gave it another thought until October 9, when I drove down to Webster County to speak to the Friends of the Library group there.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAEupora has a population of about 2500 people, living on 5.6 square miles of land. It’s amazing that they even have a library, although it’s only open three days a week and has one part-time employee and a couple of volunteers. I wasn’t sure what to expect as I drove through this tiny town and found the library. The drive itself was easy—straight down I-55 from Memphis to Winona, and then a few miles east on Highway 82. Cotton fields popped up on both sides of the highway as I gradually stepped back in time. Eupora was designated a Historic District on the National Register in 2011. The railroad depot, built in 1885, is the oldest surviving building in the town. And yes, there are wooden sidewalks.

wooden sidewalks

But there are also a number of avid readers, including some retired school teachers, in the very active Webster County Friends of the Library group. 14 of them showed up for my reading. Before the meeting started, I asked a couple of the ladies if they knew a man named Carl Ray. They immediately lit up and began telling me his story. He was Superintendent of Education in Eupora before he moved to Jackson to work with the public schools there. They adored him. Eventually he retired back home in Eupora, and had only passed away a couple of years ago. One woman had visited his 90-something-year-old widow in the nursing home just the day before I arrived in Eupora. I told them he had been my guidance counselor in high school, and they all said how lucky I was to have had him. I just smiled and agreed with their assessment of him.

Meanwhile we gathered in a tiny room in the back of the library where three tables were decorated with fall and Halloween décor. I was set up with a podium from which I gave a reading and led a discussion about my novel CHERRY BOMB. They asked very informed questions and several folks purchased copies of the book and asked me to sign them. The group even bought a copy for the library. “Miss Betty” had prepared our lunch, which was served on paper plates at our tables—ham and cheese and pimento cheese sandwiches on white bread with the crust cut off, potato chips, soft drinks, and homemade pies for dessert. As I visited with these folks I thought about how far removed their lives were from “Mare,”the young run-away graffiti artist in CHERRY BOMB, Elaine deKooning, the famous abstract expressionist painter, the Orthodox nuns and the weeping icons. Maybe I brought a little bit of color into their lives with the stories I shared. They certainly enriched my life that day in Eupora, Mississippi, and I gained a greater appreciation for Mr. Carl Ray. May he rest in peace.

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